Archive for March, 2017


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Nikon Coolpix S8200,1/1250s,4.5mm,f/3.3,ISO100.

Indian Bision is the largest extant bovine, native to South Asia and Southeast Asia. The species has been listed as Vulnerable on the IUCN Red List since 1986, as the population decline in parts of the species’ range is likely to be well over 70% during the last three generations. Population trends are stable in well-protected areas, and are rebuilding in a few areas which had been neglected.

The gaur is the tallest species of wild cattle.The gaur is a strong and massively built species with a high convex ridge on the forehead between the horns, which bends forward, causing a deep hollow in the profile of the upper part of the head. There is a prominent ridge on the back. The ears are very large; the tail only just reaches the hocks, and in old bulls the hair becomes very thin on the back.

Pink Rose-

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Nikon Coolpix S8200,1/320s,4.5mm,f/3.3,ISO 100.

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Nikon Coolpi S8200,1/250s,f/5.5,ISO180.

 

Spotted Deer, Also, known as Chital is a deer found in the Indian subcontinent.The species is sexually dimorphic: males are larger than females, and antlers are present only on males. The upper parts are golden to rufous, completely covered in white spots. The abdomen, rump, throat, insides of legs, ears and tail are all white. The antlers, three-pronged, are nearly 1 metre (3.3 ft) long.

Chital are active throughout the day. In the summer, time is spent in rest under shade and the sun’s glare is avoided if the temperature reaches 80 °F (27 °C); activity peaks as dusk approaches. As days grow cooler, foraging begins before sunrise and peaks by early morning.

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Barking Deer

Also, known as the Indian Muntjac, a common deer species in South and Southeast Asia.

It has soft, short, brownish or greyish hair, sometimes with creamy markings. This species is omnivorous, feeding on grass, fruits, shoots, seeds, birds’ eggs as well as small animals. It sometimes displays even scavenging behavior, feeding on carrion. It gives calls similar to barking, usually upon sensing a predator.

The male Indian muntjac has small, unbranched antlers which grow to about 15 centimeters (5.9 in) in length. The antlers grow annually from a bony stalk on the top of the head. Males are extremely territorial and—despite their diminutive size—can be quite fierce. They will fight each other for territory using their antlers or their (more dangerous) tusk-like upper canine teeth, and can even defend themselves against certain predators such as dogs.

They never wander far from water. Also, males usually have their own territory, which may overlap the territories of a few females but not of another male.